Why Vegan?

August 30, 2011

1. ANIMALS:
Whether animals are "free-range" organic or raised on a factory farm, there's no such thing as humane slaughter. Even most small, local farms must "process" their animals at USDA slaughterhouses in the end. Check this short overview of standard practices in the pork, poultry, dairy, beef, and seafood industries. If you eat meat and dairy, you've had this in your belly:



2. FOOD & HEALTH:
We know that on a plant-based diet, Diabetes is being reversed (1) and people are living healthfully into their 100s (2); we know that an average MD gets less than 20 hours of nutritional training (3, 4), that Big Pharma literally has hires cheerleaders to rep their meds (5) and provides their loyal doctors with trips to Hawaii (6, 7); we know that the masses fighting for healthcare plans—eating the way they do, will continue to be sick unless they aim for health instead. We're over getting played. We now have access to the most innovative information and the best foods and natural medicines on Earth...and it turns out, the keys to health and longevity are simple.



3. POLITICS: What we eat is linked to every major political issue there is: world hunger, environment and climate change, energy, water waste, civil and labor rights, healthcare, oppression, wildlife and endangered species, and more. By going vegan, you push and pull your support of these issues more directly and more often than you can at the voting booth. Put your money where you mouth is and use the most powerful political tool we have to influence change.

4. ENVIRONMENT: The U.N. reported in 2006 that animal agriculture causes more pollution than all forms of transportation combined. Both eating and wearing animals is dirty business, directly contributing to global land degradation, climate change and air pollution, water waste and contamination, and loss of biodiversity. This is not the trail we wish to leave behind.

5. CONSCIOUSNESS: If we hear one more animal-eating yogi utter "Loka samasta sukhino bhavantu" (May all beings everywhere be happy and free); if we are solicited by one more Greenpeace street-volunteer who still eats fish; if we're invited to one more hot-dog barbeque in celebration of Juneteenth...you get the picture.

Blue Zones and Cold Spots

August 26, 2011


Photo © David McLain, National Geographic

In several places around the world, termed "blue zones," people live with mobility and vigor into their 100s. And in the "cold spots" of the world, there is little to none of the disease or chronic conditions that "plague" the West.

No, these areas are not full of the rich who can pay for the best food and medicine. In fact, most of these people are financially poor. They can't afford a herd of animals and they don't have refrigerators. So they eat plant-based diets and bury their food (before the age of appliances, fermentation was a standard way of preserving food). They commune with their families and neighbors, they feel a sense of connectedness and purpose, and they've made moving their bodies a priority in life.

Sounds rich to us—this is about quality of life. What do people from the blue zones and cold spots have in common? Here's what we can learn:

•Eat a plant-based diet:
These people eat little to no meat. Instead, the bulk of their diet is simple whole foods, deep greens, healing herbs, and spices.

•Eat small portions:

it's a documented fact that the less one eats, the longer one lives. The heavier your meals—especially food unnatural to the human system, the more wear, tear, and burden on your energy and every cells in your bod.

•Eat good raw fats:
Coconut, olive oil, chlorella, avocado, raw cacao (omega-6), omega-3 (hempseed, chia, flax, AFA blue green algae). Healthy fats seem more important than protein in these diets, demonstrating a few interesting things.
A) If you eat food, you get enough protein.
B) Fats contain more calories than protein (9:4 cal/g), which means longer sustaining energy.
C) When you think you're craving protein, you're most likely in need of good fat.

•Eat fermented foods:
Kimchee, coconut kefir, kombucha, sauerkraut, these foods contain billions of "good bacteria" (probiotics) that promote health in the gut—thought to be the core of the immune system.

•Socialize:
B
e part of a community. Show up, have someone's back, and let others get yours, too.

•Keep it movin':
Dance, walk, garden, shake it...at least sit on the floor and stretch while you're watching TV!  

I'd Go Vegan, BUT...

August 24, 2011



Were you considering going vegan but you think all your veg friends look like they’re dying? Or did you try going vegan yourself, but you ended up wilted and weak?

If that's a "hell to the yes," we totally understand. While most vegans we know are thriving and glowing with health, vegan-eating doesn't necessarily denote healthy eating. We mean, almost anything is better than a diet of dead, leukemia-stricken flesh and pus milk—but to be optimally healthy, you have to be eating non-processed whole foods, superfoods, and lots of greens. The more raw, mineralized, nutrient-rich foods you have in your daily repertoire, the better you’ll feel—and the more likely you are to stay vegan.

If your vegan friends are not lookin’ so hot, most likely, they are living on processed concoctions of faux meats, soy cheese, rancid oils, breads, potato chips, and pasta… that’s a whole lot of dead food—fried, boiled, baked, and burned—to feed their screaming yeast. And your vegetarian friends, they’re piling dairy on top of all that! You just can’t sustain a healthy immune system on that garbage.

Granted, even if you’re eating all the right things while you transition, one still might have ups and downs on the journey. Often, these health hiccups are evidence of the “Herxheimer effect” —essentially, cleansing reactions. Clearing out the havoc that meat and dairy causes in the body is a real thing and can take time. These are not reasons to start eating meat and dairy again, but to look further into feeding your body right, especially while you cleanse.

So, if you’re feeling uncertain about going vegan because of our soy-guzzling brothers and sisters (we still love them for the cause), look a little further to the beaming and bright-eyed vegans who know what’s up. We even have vegan athletes on our side now who look like superheroes and have one thing in common—they eat a lot of fresh, raw foods: triathalon champion Brendan Brazier, MMA fighters Jon Fitch, Nick Diaz, and Mac Danzig, figure competitor Claudia Cuellar, and b-boy icons—Mr. Wiggles and Flowmaster, not to mention a host of other modelesque, in-shape vegans who rep our culture raw.

It's a new era. Those invested in health and physicality are redefining the means and methods to strength, endurance, recovery, and longevity—not to mention quality of life. So don’t hesitate. Get prepared to do it right.

 

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