Raw Vegan Probiotic Nut Cheese

September 26, 2011


Raw vegan almond cheese topped with dried oregano & pepper flakes

This is way easier than I thought. Don't worry about exact measurements, just experiment with the following basic idea:
Soak cashews or almonds, blend with probiotic, let sit.

Here's what I did:
1. Soak raw cashews in water for at least 2 hours. The longer you soak, the softer they become, the better they blend. If you use almonds instead, soak overnight and then pinch each one to peel off the skins.

2. Drain the nuts and blend with sea salt and a few squeezes of lemon juice to taste. Add just enough water— a tiny bit at a time—to make it blend. Optional: add nutritional yeast, garlic, herbs, etc, to taste.

3. Add a probiotic element. This could be a spoonful of organic miso paste, a TBS of coconut kefir, or the powder inside a probiotic capsule. Blend gentlyfor a couple of seconds (it's best not to "chop up" the microscopic culture strains).

Step 4 with our little rock weight.

Some people skip the next cheese-cloth step and just put the mixture into a boiled-clean glass jar. But we did this:

4. Hang a double-bagged cheese-cloth inside a jar and pour in the mixture. Fold in the inside bag and lay a small weight on top to press out any liquid, we used a little rock!


Step 5

5. Cover the jar with a cap or plate and place it in a room-temperature spot for 24-48 hours. We actually put our jar in the dehydrator set on 100 degrees (low) to speed up the process overnight.

In the end, you can use the liquid collected at the bottom of the jar as the probiotic element in the next batch. You'll know it's done because it will smell "cheesy." The longer you leave it, the more sour (fermented) the cheese will be. Pack the drained mixture into a glass container, let cool in the fridge, and enjoy! Optional: top with dried oregano and pepper flakes.

I Only Eat Grassfed Bison

September 12, 2011

Years of study has led us to the following rule: Whether it’s a feather hair extension or grass-fed bison you’re buying, whenever and wherever animals are exchanged for money, you can bet it’s dirty business. Switching from factory-farmed meat to grass-fed bison, for example, doesn’t eliminate environmental degradation, water and energy waste, water-deprived truck rides to the butcher, slaughter, or lowlife politics. Switching meats often just changes the set of problems.



For example: 
•Many bison ranches are adjacent to natural parks where wild bison and wild elk roam. When wild animals carrying brucellosis (an infectious bacteria transmittable to humans and other animals) cross park boundaries during their winter migratory routes, they can infect ranched herds—the common consequences being that the rancher must kill his entire stable. So in the interest of cattle farmers, the state of Montana, under, for example, the Interagency Bison Management Plan, drives back its wild bison herds using helicopters, hazing, slaughter, and penning. In 2004 at Yellowstone National Park, 264 wild bison were rounded up and slaughtered in order to protect 180 cows grazing on land nearby. Another 198 were rather corralled until the following season, but for lack of space in the pen, 57 were killed without even testing for brucellosis. In 2008, 1,616 bison were driven from park borders and slaughtered.

•North America used to be home to 50 million bison. Now, the last free-roaming, genetically pure herd—descendents of 23 wild bison that survived mass slaughter— exist in Yellowstone National Park, numbering 3,000. Wildlife advocates have been working to restore Yellowstone’s bison populations for relocation onto protected areas nationwide, but ranch lobbyists around the country stand in the way. Because of ranchers’ fear of brucellosis spreading to their cattle, wild bison may never be allowed to repopulate public land again, especially because the competition against livestock owners for cheap grazing land is fierce.

•Even if your grass-fed bison is “organic” today, it still may have been genetically modified and bred in the past. Being that the only pure herd exists in Montana, the many ranched bison across America are not as natural as a consumer might hope, but rather mixed with cattle genes.

So think about it: Are organic grassfed bison farmers the people you want to be giving your money to? What side of politics do you want to be on?



  

Sources: LA Times1, LA Times2, and Save the Buffalo Campaign.
Photos from: Photos from www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

Why Vegan?

August 30, 2011

1. ANIMALS:
Whether animals are "free-range" organic or raised on a factory farm, there's no such thing as humane slaughter. Even most small, local farms must "process" their animals at USDA slaughterhouses in the end. Check this short overview of standard practices in the pork, poultry, dairy, beef, and seafood industries. If you eat meat and dairy, you've had this in your belly:



2. FOOD & HEALTH:
We know that on a plant-based diet, Diabetes is being reversed (1) and people are living healthfully into their 100s (2); we know that an average MD gets less than 20 hours of nutritional training (3, 4), that Big Pharma literally has hires cheerleaders to rep their meds (5) and provides their loyal doctors with trips to Hawaii (6, 7); we know that the masses fighting for healthcare plans—eating the way they do, will continue to be sick unless they aim for health instead. We're over getting played. We now have access to the most innovative information and the best foods and natural medicines on Earth...and it turns out, the keys to health and longevity are simple.



3. POLITICS: What we eat is linked to every major political issue there is: world hunger, environment and climate change, energy, water waste, civil and labor rights, healthcare, oppression, wildlife and endangered species, and more. By going vegan, you push and pull your support of these issues more directly and more often than you can at the voting booth. Put your money where you mouth is and use the most powerful political tool we have to influence change.

4. ENVIRONMENT: The U.N. reported in 2006 that animal agriculture causes more pollution than all forms of transportation combined. Both eating and wearing animals is dirty business, directly contributing to global land degradation, climate change and air pollution, water waste and contamination, and loss of biodiversity. This is not the trail we wish to leave behind.

5. CONSCIOUSNESS: If we hear one more animal-eating yogi utter "Loka samasta sukhino bhavantu" (May all beings everywhere be happy and free); if we are solicited by one more Greenpeace street-volunteer who still eats fish; if we're invited to one more hot-dog barbeque in celebration of Juneteenth...you get the picture.

 

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